Floristics in Bulgarian

For some time now, I have enjoyed watching her work, and recently I managed to get in touch with her. I invite you to my interview with the Bulgarian florist and photographer Malina Simeonova, who works as a florist in Sofia, Bulgaria.

 Michał Bursig:

 Hello – Tell me a few words about yourself – what else do you like to do, what is your hobby?

 

Malina Simeonova:

I love being out in nature – hiking in the woods is cleansing and refreshing for me. I am an amateur photographer, I love macro photography! The real joy for me is discovering and photographing various small details. For me, making a bouquet and taking photos, as well as processing the photo afterwards, is equal pleasure. I consider myself a happy person because I have been doing the things I love all my life.

What was your path to the profession?

I never thought that I would arrange flowers professionally. I finished painting, but when I started looking for a job, I found it in a flower shop, so it was more of a vocation that found me. Today my work continues to surprise me, it still brings interesting challenges and inspires. And most importantly, thanks to this work, I feel like an artist! Looking at your works, I can see both beauty and professionalism.

Where are you looking for inspiration for your works?

The impulse to create something out of something else is everywhere. It can be a flower or a decorative material. A beautiful button can awaken my imagination and make me create a whole color composition around it. I also love following the work of florists around the world. They are an inexhaustible source of new ideas!

Malina Simeonova

Malina Simeonova

Malina Simeonova

Which part of the florist’s profession do you like best?

I like making bouquets and taking care of potted plants, planting flowers or arranging a shop window. The place where I work now covers most areas of the craft, which allows me to do something different on a daily basis. So I never get bored 😊

 

How has the pandemic affected your professional development?

How did you deal with this difficult time for florists? I think that in my case this time was comparable to the experience of many other florists. The pandemic imposed changes to the way the world works: people worked more from their homes, increasing their interest in flowers and garden plants. More people wanted to make their surroundings more attractive. In turn, a traditional client has practically disappeared from an office building near the flower shop.

In fact, I had similar observations at my florist in Kielce.

Tell me, how do you rate floristry in Bulgaria and do you observe the work of florists from Poland?

Floristry in Bulgaria as a whole is still at an early stage of development. Seminars and training sessions are held, but there is no school yet with industry-recognized diplomas. There are many talented and creative people who find a way to grow and create joy for the eyes. When it comes to floristry in Poland, my knowledge comes only from the observation of your floristic portal. I can say that we can learn from ourselves.

 

Thank you very much for the interview. Your work has definitely encouraged me to visit Bulgaria and visit Bulgarian florists. See you in Sofia!

Malina Simeonova

 

Raspberry’s works can be viewed on the profile @ wklej link  Malina Simeonova Floral Design

Malina Simeonova

 

Malina Simeonova

Raspberry’s works can be viewed on the profile @ wklej link  Malina Simeonova Floral Design